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Freeing Yourself From Tobacco

Tobacco is one of the toughest addictions there is - and one of the deadliest. Healthy Community Coalition is committed to offering support and assistance to anyone in our community looking for support in quitting tobacco or staying away from it so you never start.

Healthy Community Coalition’s tobacco recovery program is designed to help individuals through the tobacco recovery process and to remain tobacco-free. Qualified tobacco recovery counselors at provide ongoing, free, confidential, individualized tobacco and nicotine recovery support and counseling. For more information contact Cheryl Moody, RN, at 207-779-2214

For additional assistance in quitting, contact the Maine Tobacco hotline for free, confidential support by phone for smokers who want to quit.

Free Yourself from Tobacco

Call the Maine Tobacco Helpline at 1-800-207-1230

Tobacco Free Franklin program’s goal is to prevent tobacco and nicotine delivery systems use to decrease lung cancer incidence and mortality. Trained tobacco recovery specialists offer one-on-one community education. For more information contact Cheryl Moody, RN, at 207-779-2214, or cmoody2@fchn.org.

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