Conducting Hands-Only CPR Training

Hands-Only CPR has been shown to be as effective as conventional CPR for sudden cardiac arrest and can double or even triple a person’s chance of survival. Here are some of reasons why:

  • Bystanders are more likely to perform Hand-Only CPR rather than conventional CPR.
  • This technique can keep blood flowing to the brain and vital organs until emergency responders can arrive.

MaineHealth is committed to training as many people as possible in Hands-Only CPR so they can initiate treatment while waiting for emergency response teams.

In partnership with the American Heart Association, 55 MaineHealth employees were trained on the use of Hands-Only CPR over the course of four sessions held in August and September of 2017.

Learn Hands-Only CPR

View guidance from the American Red Cross.

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