Skip to main content

Helping Heart Attack Patients Survive Through a Coordinated System of Care

Lobsterman holding a lobster by oceanSince the inception of the AMI PERFUSE Program, deaths due to heart attack in the MaineHealth service area have declined by about 50 percent.

When a heart attack occurs, immediate treatment is needed to prevent death and avoid permanent damage to the heart muscle.

The MaineHealth AMI (Acute Myocardial Infarction) PERFUSE (Patients Emergently Reperfused by Facilities United for STEMI Excellence) Program is a regional system that aims to provide the fastest, most appropriate heart attack care and in turn ensure the best possible outcomes for patients. The regional system involves all MaineHealth hospitals, and the emergency medical services providers in the communities they serve. Here is how the program works:

  • When a person with symptoms of a heart attack arrives at the emergency department of their local hospital, clinicians work as quickly as possible to complete an electrocardiogram (EKG) and, if the patient is having a heart attack, provide medications.
  • Treatment can begin sooner when the local emergency medical responders are called; technicians with advanced training in heart attack care perform EKGs in the ambulance so that hospital emergency departments get the information before the patient arrives.
  • The patient is then transported to Maine Medical Center as soon as possible to receive surgery to repair the arteries causing the heart attack.
  • Timeframes are set by American College of Cardiology and the American Hospital Association.

A critical part of the program’s success is ensuring that patients return to their local community for ongoing cardiovascular care.

Tracking Progress

Explore some of the data being tracked by AMI PERFUSE Program.

 

 The AMI PERFUSE program reports that for those that arrive at the hospital experiencing a heart attack:

  • Currently, 82% of patients had an electrocardiogram en route or within 10 minutes of arriving at a local emergency room.    
  • 70% received thrombolytic therapy within 30 minutes of arriving at the local emergency rooms. 
  • 85% received an angioplasty within 90 minutes of arriving at a surgical hospital.
  • Timeframes are set by American College of Cardiology and the American Hospital Association.

 

PERFUSE2018
Woman practicing how to do Hands-Only CPR.

Conducting Hands-Only CPR Training

MaineHealth is committed to training people on this life-saving technique.
Women sitting on bench with bikes

Cardiovascular Health

See the progress being made to decrease cardiovascular deaths. 

Health Index Tobacco FCO

MaineHealth Health Index

View data on our seven priorities and progress on MaineHealth targets. 

Latest News

View All
Trauma Intervention Program Transitions to TIP National
Management of the Trauma Intervention Program (TIP) of Greater Portland, formerly part of Maine Behavioral Healthcare has transitioned to its founding organization, Trauma Intervention Programs, Inc., (TIP National) effective September 1, 2020.
SMHC Offering Free Mammograms for Women Without Insurance in October
October is Breast Cancer Awareness Month and Southern Maine Health Care (SMHC) is offering free mammograms to women in the community age 40 or older without active breast problems who do not have insurance.
Drive-through Flu Shots Available at MaineHealth Care at Home
MaineHealth Care at Home (MHCAH) will be offering drive-through flu shots for all community members at their Saco location at 15 Industrial Park Rd.
Franklin Community Health Network offers flu clinics
Franklin Community Health Network is offering drive-up flu clinics in October for adults on the Franklin Memorial Hospital campus and via mobile outreach by the Healthy Community Coalition. No appointment is required.